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Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
in upstate new york. another teed off on comments made by the head of the nra, who told nbc's david gregory he favors armed guards at every school. >> i guess, you know, out of last week's bizarre press statement -- it wasn't a press conference -- i guess mr. lapierre would say that firefighters need to have armed guards go with them. i mean, i think it just shows that that was a completely dumb [ bleep ] idea from the start. we need to ban assault weapons, we need to ban the high-capacity clips and magazines. we need serious background information system upgrade. >> if it's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our schools to protect our children, then call me crazy. i'll tell you what, the american people -- i think the american people think it's crazy not to do it. it's the one thing that would keep people safe. and the nra is going to try to do that. >> in the wake of recent shootings, a local new york newspaper is facing calls to pull an article. "the journal news" created a web feature showing the addresses of all handgun permit holders in westchester and rockland cou
about what you put into your gas tank. let's get up to speed, back the floor of the new york stock exchange and nicole petallides. economic data on the service industry. nicole: looking good, lori and melissa. up 125 points. after two days of selling we are seeing some market action to the upside. we are above the 13,000 mark, well above that. 13,076. the nasdaq squeezing it out. concern for apple, but financials are doing well. let's take a look at the group. laying off 11,000 workers, that is the plan. a new ceo in place and he wants to make his mark. up 6.5%. it is under pressure, nowhere near $700 for the all-time high in september. the latest findings other actually going to use the market share for the ipad to the android in some microsoft folks, they're facing intense competition. with the findings you see stocks down 4%. back to you. melissa: interesting. lori: thank you. melissa: a battle for a deal inn the fiscal cliff continues, democrats cannot seem to find a compromise on top earners. rich edson is back in the white house with more. >> president obama said look, if rep
's wednesday, december 12th. look at that shot of new york city. >> wow. >> it's dark at 6:00 on the east coast. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set here in new york city, we have msnbc contributor, mike barnicle. >> in my ear, mika. >> no, he was at the white house. >> i don't understand. where's t.j.? >> he's off today. >> why's that? >> he was busy. he went to the white house. >> that's great. you know, alex went to the white house, too. >> and drove back himself. >> let me get this straight. so alex goes to the white house last night. >> mm-hmm. >> because, you know, right-wing bloggers, we actually -- that's how we get our talking points. they go down -- valerie and david axelrod together make a big pot roast for us. >> mm-hmm. >> and lots of gravy. and we sit around eating it. and i, of course, say okay, give me extra gravy. i'm good with it. >> right. >> best sweet tea i've ever had. >> there's a give and take. >> actually, it was a christmas party. go ahead and do your blog. you sure as hell didn't get mitt romney to like it. they're not attacking me. i wouldn't know. i don't read
, in much of upstate new york, they've canceled preemptively the flights out of there for tomorrow and here's why. here is the big snow picture. kind of the snow sweet spot from cleveland through i-90 and in toward buffalo, rochester, syracuse, so it is all lifting to the north. the same storm that we have seen bring feet of snow elsewhere. so going a little bit closer, you can see very dark white is heavy snow, maybe 1, 2 inches an hour. and right along the lakefront, cleveland, erie, buffalo and points down. so i-86, i-90, i-80, i-80 tonight we'll watch the snow lift farther north and then driving perilous conditions tomorrow. really in upstate new york and western new york. and part of the problem is is that we thought thehave these i strong winds. right now indy gusting to 33 miles an hour. as far south as nashville, cleveland, as well, 32-mile-per-hour wind gusts. and that axis of winds is pushing into the northeast for upstate no, late tonight and really balance of tomorrow. in terms of the blizzard, there's the blizzard warning now. it's down to just a few counties. in north central
that? "the new york times" recently wrote that in florida, quote, as he ballot scandal seemed to arrive like clockwork. end of quote. i am pleased that two secretaries of state are with us today. i welcome i was secretary of state, matt schulz, state election officials are well-versed on the procedures that are needed to run their elections. conscientious state officials such as my secretary of state have sought to remove noncitizens from the voter rolls. federal officials did not assist them in ensuring that legal holes are not honored by the counting of votes from ineligible voters. in fact, the department fact the department of homeland security did all he could to prevent maintaining integrity of voting roll. we will hear that turnout rises when ballot integrity is fostered. states have a fair amount of discretion in how they choose to run elections. early voting has grown in popularity. but there's a cost even beyond the lack of a common civic engagement on election day. and i look forward to this hearing, and hope that we get an answer to these questions. but circumstances could c
. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and environment. i'm greg dalton. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed, quote, global warming has begun, expert tells senate. a quarter century later, dr. hansen and other scientists are still striving to convince much of the united states that basic scientific observation -- seas are rising, glaciers are disappearing, floods are increasing. humans are the cause. about half of amer
, a contributor to forbes.com and former detroit bureau chief for the "new york times," and by bill ballenger, editor of "inside michigan politics." welcome to you both. mickey maynard. first, this has all happened very quickly. what precipitated this right now. >> there were two things that happened, judy. first of all in november there was a ballot proposal that unions floated that would have outlawed right-to-work. it would have put that into the state constitution. that proposal failed because it was proposed at the same time as a lot of constitutional amendments. people just sort of cast one vote against all of them. the second thing that happened was republicans gave up some seats in the house and senate. it will still be a republican majority in january but it will be smaller. if right-to-work was going to happen this lame duck republican-controlled legislature was where it was going to happen. >> woodruff: bill, in a state that voted by ten points for president obama in november, it's a state that is striking a blow for right-to-work. how do you explain that? >> there was a mixeded re
of urgency required by the times in which they were forged. recently, "the new york times" columnist david brooks sum a -- summarized this concept well when he wrote that there are policies that are not permanently right and that situations matter most. tax cuts might be right in one decade but wrong the next. title regulations might be right one decade but if sclerosis sets in, then deregulation might be in order. madam president, as we confront the impending confluence of issues known as the fiscal cliff, we are at a moment of major significance that requires the applications of the principle that brooks describes, and for the sake of the country, we must demonstrate to the american people that we are, in fact, capable of making the big decisions by putting in place an agreement and a framework to avoid the fiscal cliff before we adjourn this year. madam president, we are surrounded by history perpetually here in the senate as well as throughout the capitol. how could we not be inspired by it to rise to this occasion? indeed, if you know history, you understand the very story of america'
don't realize, there are many more to be licensees that other people realize. in new york, where i am, the number is 28. there was a large allocation of these licenses before cable and satellite and what we're doing now, and this is the -- i think innovation of auctions, how can we use market mechanisms to reallocate some of that spectrum to mobile broadband in a win-win way? and that is what we're doing. that is why there will be brauferts who remain in new york and -- broadcasters who remain in new york and others. there is tremendous opportunity to free up spectrum to promote innovation. >> when we moved over the 200 megahertz in 2003, we had a two-star general who said it's absolutely technologically impossible to do. so again, do you have a process that's totally fair to the broadcasters and to the wireless industry that's in place? have you had them in your office simultaneously with their engineers to talk about the issues so that you can hear and your experts can hear the differences which they have? >> that's exactly what we're doing. through the notice and comment process, t
new york from the year with the bombing campaign. everyone was focused on the prospect, especially after world war one showed us what a meat grinder war could be, that that meat grinder would come to their homes into their children. no one wanted the cities of europe to be destroyed. it was just a total nightmare. easily as much of a nightmare as well we're thinking could happen and remarkably enough, we call the lawyer said then. everyone agreed the league of nations, the hague convention, bombing civilian targets from the year was a war crime, and not only that, but fdr on september 1st 1939 was going to work with everybody else was. he used a moral authority of the united states test everyone of the combatants to agree right there not to bomb civilian targets by the year end from the end of the day he had the bridge from everybody, the nazis agreed to it, but polish, french, germans, and the british all agreed that they would not bomb from the air civilian targets and they didn't by and large. the liftoff had always said announcements and penalties for people who violated the st
been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and with it, more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts. in a last bid for a deal, president obama stated his terms face-to-face to top republicans and democrats. >> congressional leaders arrive ted white house this afternoon for their first group meeting with the president since november 16th. vice president biden and treasury secretary timothy geithner also attend. but there was little to suggest the makings of an 11th hour bargain. a source familiar with the meeting told the newshour its president is sticking with his offer from last friday.
in new york. >> back in the '80s and very early '90s japan actually overpaid. they bought the pebble beach golf course in california and bought rockefeller center in new york. various other properties and paid huge dollars for them and lot of their shirts. this time around with china is not the case. you can't say they're paying a lot of money for aig's plane leasing business or a123. martha: stuart, thank you. see you coming up on the business channel. bill: here is the question for you. how much american debt does china actually own? as the largest foreign owner of u.s. debt it owns more than a trillion dollars in treasury securities. china's holding of u.s. debt has increased 56% over the course of the obama presidency which comes out to about $400 billion more. it has bought or invested in more than $15 billion in more than 100 u.s. companies going pack to january of 2010. that is influence. martha: new numbers raising fresh concerns here at home about our economy. the u.s. consumer spending numbers showing signs of weakening after four months of gains. experts blame things like
: rising sea levels. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg announced a new long-term initiative to protect the city from future natural disasters. he called for rebuilding vulnerable coastal areas, but dismissed again the idea of constructing a large sea-gate across the harbor. >> we're not going to abandon the waterfront. we're not going to abandon the rockaways or coney island or staten island's south shore. but we can't just rebuild what was there and hope for the best. we have to build smarter and stronger and more sustainably. >> woodruff: 350 miles south. the city of norfolk, virginia, is another coastal city vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme storms. but its mayor has said parts of his city might not be livable in the future. our producer, mike melia, traveled to norfolk recently to look at how it has been struggling with flooding and preparing for the next big storm. he worked with member station whro to bring us this report. it's part of our series-- working with public media partners across the country-- that we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: when r
from new york. mr. schumer: i ask unanimous consent the quorum call be repealed. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. schumer: thank you, mr. president. first i want to thank my great colleague from pennsylvania, i enjoyed sharing a table last night with him and his beautiful, charming, intelligent wife, who he's lucky he would be the first to admit he's lucky to have married, and their four great girls. but second, thank him for his excellent, as usual, on-target remarks. we have a great chairman of the j.e.c. and every time he comes to the floor, it shows shoas. olympia snowe, bill kristol, congressman mike simpson of idaho, david brooks, congresswoman bono-mack and walter jones, "the national review." we're here to ai seau passing the senate's middle-class tax cut is the right thing to do. you don't have to take our word for it. two-thirds of the american public agrees with us but you don't need to take their word for it, either. just listen to the voices within speaker boehner's own party. there we go. a kent conrad i am not in terms of my facility with charts. it's clear
: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the remaking of the obama administration's foreign policy team began today as the president nominated massachusetts senator john kerry to replace hilary clinton as secretary of state. the former presidential candidate who lost to george w. bush in 2004 got the nod after u.n. ambassador susan rice withdrew her name. she'd faced republican criticisms over the benghazi terrorist attack. president obama made the announcement this afternoon at the white house. >> i am very proud to announce my choice for america's next secretary of state, john kerry. in a sense, john's entire life has prepared him for this role. havi
. but first, with the other news of the day, here's kwame holman. >> holman: police in webster, new york, found human remains today in the burned-out home where a gunman ambushed firefighters on christmas eve. the victim appeared to be william spengler's sister. he left a note saying he wanted to burn down the neighborhood and kill people. spengler set fire to his house, then shot four firefighters-- killing two-- before killing himself. he had a revolver, a shotgun, and a bushmaster rifle, the same model used in the newtown school shooting. >> i can't tell you at this time what the victims were shot with. we assume it was the rifle because of the distance. it's going to go to the medical examiner. they'll have the autopsies done. >> holman: two firefighters remained hospitalized today in stable condition. the fire spengler set ultimately burned seven homes. the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed mors
at his home in new york. he came to be known as the king of character actors. in a 50-year career that spanned broadway, the movies and television. along the way he earned two oscar nominations. one was for his role as the corrupt governor in the best little whorehouse in texas in 1992. in tootsies he played the suitor of dustin hoffman who was posing as a female soap opera star. now back to gwen. >> ifill: we turn to politics and part 2 of our lookality upcoming elections. last night i had talkd with newshour political editor christina bellantoni about how senate contests. tonight we continue our conversation. welcome. let's talk some more politics. i want to start with illinois where jesse jackson, jr. who just resigned his house seat has left a wide ownen political fight in his wake. >> there will be a special election to fill his house seat which is the second district on the south side of chicago. just about 10 blocks or so from president obama's home. this is a very geographically diverse district. it includes the urban parts of the south side of chicago, sub urban parts. an
. [applause] i would also like to welcome former governor from new york patacky and thank you for your leadership. over the next days you will learn about sustainable practices. you will network with the greatest minds in the industry and enjoy your time here. be thoughtful. be creative and go out and lead the befl energy and green policies for the rest of the country. congratulations and thanks for being here in san francisco. [applause] >> my name is peter stein. i'm a lifelong friend of milton marks and his family at least going back a generation and it's really my honor today on behalf of milton's family, friends and his wife abbey and his sons and nathan and will and theo and you will be hearing from this afternoon. it's really my honor to welcome you to this commennation of the life and spirit of our irreplaceable friend miltion marks. today we will hear tributes and memories from those that knew milton in many aspects of his life and work, and i think together these memories and tributes will begin to form a mosaic of the multi-dimensional man he was. i use that word beca
impossible to figure from week to week. eli manning and the new york giants who have looked so strong at times during the year were totally dominated by the atlanta falcons. same falcons who last week went down to carolina, shut the giants out today 34-0. >>> not long ago the bears were the nfcs number two seed today they tried to rally it home against the packers just to stay in the play off picture. this combination worked all day for green bay. aaron rogers at san jose state product in stride. just before halftime it's rogers to jones again. the bears have lost five of their last six. minnesota's rusty. the vickings took control of this game. peterson slowed a bit but then he's off to an 82 touchdown run before the day was over, peterson had rushed for 224 yards after the 36-22 win minnesota has improved to 8-6. >>> the redskins were in cleveland without the services of griffin iii. the redskins didn't miss a beat. cousins rolls out three cleveland defenders can't keep up with leonard. a pair of touchdowns and washington 38-21 when the redskins. right now would be the winners in t
, new york, massachusetts, connecticut, and tennessee. a total of 40 schools will add at least 300 hours to the standard school calendar. the goal is to see whether more time will make american students more competitive on a global level. britain welcomed news today that prince william and his wife catherine are expecting their first child. the announcement said the 30- year-old mother is in the early weeks of pregnancy. she's hospitalized in london with a severe form of morning sickness, and she's expected to remain there for several days. the baby will be third in line to the british throne. prince charles is first, followed by william. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: how tough is too tough when it comes to sports and brain injuries? it's an issue we've followed over a number of years. today there was new data to chew on. week after week the big hits keep attracting big audiences to professional and college football. but concerns over head injuries in football and other sports have also continued. the connection between repeated blows and a degen
to helping new jersey and certainly new york as well and the region, recovered. because you know, when we had hurricane katrina in the gulf coast in mississippi and alabama and louisiana, i was there. when we had tornadoes in joplin missouri, i was there. when we had flooding along the mississippi, i was there. when we had crop destruction in the midwest, i have been there because i believe this is the united states of america. and so i fully expect that now that for the first time we have a type of devastation that other should understand and we are going to have to type a response that others have to see. so i would like to get a sense of view as the type of commitment this administration has. >> senator, thank you for the eloquent remarks about this. as you know, this is a region i too have roots in. to use your term, i married up, i married a jersey girl and work in new jersey and new york and besides the personal commitment i feel, i have also seen a president who was on the ground, in new jersey and almost immediately has done everything he can to help in the short term and has given me
to be asking right now. >> now the film isn't even out yet. it is limited release in new york and los angeles on december the 28th. it opens nationwide on january 4th but conservative bloggers got a hold of the copy of the script. when they looked through it, melissa, they this is really one-sided piece that looks more like a hit job against fracking than a balanced look at the natural gas industry. melissa: i think it is interesting it was supposed to be about the impacts on salmon and all of sudden turned over to fracking which is so popular right now. they're keying on something a revolution in this country. what has the industry's reaction been like so far? what do they think? >> no question the industry is worried about this. i talked to one industry analyst thought this could be to the fracking industry what the film the china syndrome with jane fonda and jack lemmon was to the nuclear power industry. charles ebinger is analyst with the brookings institute. here is what he told me. >> matt damon will give a convincing actor, undoubtedly casting concerns about shale gas on horizon and th
, philadelphia, new york city, boston, the most congested corridor in the united states of america, that is the only 600 miles that we really own. we another small stretches around the commuter -- all the rest of amtrak service, over 20,000 miles of private freight rail. i see the main rail people in the audience and they have concerns too about using theirs and not having dedicated them and we need to address that issue as we move forward. final point is northeast quarter is where we should be putting the focus. give the administration credit for at least taking the money that has been turned back dedicating so that to the northeast quarter but we are doing it in a piecemeal, half baked fashion. the northeast corridor, every state, every major area can benefit by bringing high-speed rail to the northeast corridor. 70% of our air traffic delays emanate from the northeast corridor even when we have next-generation air traffic control, move planes faster and closer together with doubling of air-traffic, all of the other restrictions we have in that corridor, you must have high-speed
come from a state that recognizes same-sex marriage, like massachusetts, like new york, know what the state has to recognize that marriage. and it won't be recognized by any federal purposes, for example, social security. there has been a challenge to the constitutionality of that at -- that act. the court of appeals upheld it unconstitutional. the review has been filed in the supreme court. we haven't acted on it yet but it would be extraordinary for the court to act, to consider the constitutionality of a law passed by congress that a lower court had held unconstitutional. so i think it's most likely that we will have that issue before the court, toward the end of the current term. and then the person who asked the question will -- [inaudible] have the answer. >> another question comes from the auditorium. the lilly ledbetter case, one where you wrote a very emotionally charged dissent, that you, as i recall, read from the branch a game binge -- read from the bench, which is a rare act. and you reflect on that and also how it felt to have literally your request in the dissent, t
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)

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